Sherry Turkle, PhD

MIT’s Abby Rockefeller Mauzé Professor of the Social Studies of Science and Technology; author, Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other (2011)

Sherry Turkle, PhD, is a professor, author, consultant and researcher. She spent the last 20 years researching the psychology of people’s relationships with technology.  She is the Abby Rockefeller Mauzé Professor of the Social Studies of Science and Technology in the Program in Science, Technology, and Society at MIT.  She is the founder and current director of the MIT Initiative on Technology and Self, a center of research and reflection on the evolving connections between people and artifacts. One of the few researchers in this field, Sherry offers a unique perspective on meaning and mechanisms – on humans and technology and social interaction.  Sherry's latest book, Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other, describes technology's influence on new, unsettling relationships between friends, lovers, parents, and children, and new instabilities in how we understand privacy and community, intimacy and solitude.

Sherry is the author of several books including Psychoanalytic Politics: Jacques Lacan and Freud's French Revolution, The Second Self: Computers and the Human Spirit, and Life on the Screen:  Identity in the Age of the Internet. She is the editor of Evocative Objects: Thinking With Things, Falling for Science: Objects in Mind, and The Inner History of Devices. Profiles of Sherry have appeared in such publications as The New York Times, Scientific American, and Wired Magazine. She is a featured media commentator on the effects of technology for CNN, NBC, ABC, and NPR, including appearances on such programs as Nightline and 20/20. Professor Turkle received a joint doctorate in sociology and personality psychology from Harvard University and is a licensed clinical psychologist.